Unlike skillets, sauté pans are very common in most households. Also, some people own saute pans but confuse them with frying pans. However, these are two different cookware. In simple terms, sauté pans are a hybrid of skillets and saucepans, making them versatile. They have deeper verticals sidewalls and comes with a lid.
Is a sauté pan necessary? A sauté pan is essential cookware you ought to own in your kitchen due to its versatility. It can cook different foods in a variety of techniques from searing, deep frying to sautéing. This article addresses why you need a sauté pan, its advantages, and when to cook in it.

Inside Atgrills saute pan

Why You Need a Sauté Pan

You’ve probably heard some people say they don’t need a sauté pan since their skillets can do most things a sauté pan does. While that might be the case, a sauté pan is more versatile than a typical skillet. In addition, sauté pans are designed with straight deeper sides that are more effective for holding liquids such as oils, sauces, and broth from splashing while cooking.
Below are reasons why you should have a sauté pan in your kitchen.
•    Suitable for shallow frying
A sauté pan is perfect cookware when you want to shallow fry foods. It entails filling the pan with a fair amount of cooking oil and heating it. You should notice food sizzle and half-covered while in the cooking.
The deep and straight sides of a sauté pan make it possible to shallow fry a variety of foods without spilling the hot cooking oil.
•    It’s good for braising
Do you enjoy vegetables and meat that is slowly cooked in oils and moisture? If you do, a sauté pan is necessary for your cooking. Braising entails cooking foods partially covered by a liquid at low temperatures with a lid cover on a stovetop or the oven.
As highlighted above, there are cooking methods you cannot perform with a skillet. That’s why the ultimate choice for braising foods is a sauté pan.
•    A selection for wilting and sautéing greens
Wilting vegetables is one of the simplest cooking techniques that you can achieve in a sauté pan. It entails adding vegetables and herbs to warm ingredients to cook briefly and for a short time. It’s to “wilt” the vegetables, whereby you’ll end with somewhat raw ingredients and spend minimum time in the kitchen. Why a “wilt” vegetables in a sauté pan anyway? It has a deep cooking area and can accommodate more vegetables.
You can also sauté foods, i.e., cooking foods quickly with a minimum amount of oil and relatively high heat. It’s similar to wilting, but you’ve to toss the foods in the pan. No doubt, a sauté pan will handle this kind of task in your kitchen.
•    Transfer recipes between a stovetop to an oven
Probably, you might be wondering. “Can I put a sauté pan in an oven?” Well, you can if it is made from the right material.
Note: Pans with plastic handles or a non-stick (some coats and not all) coating are unsuitable for this kind of cooking. However, sauté pans made from copper, stainless steel, and copper are oven safe.
If your pan is oven-safe, it’s good for half-cooking recipes on the stovetop and then transferring the same to an oven.

So, When Should I Use a Sauté Pan?

A sauté pan is versatile and can handle a range of cooking techniques. It should be used for the following:
•    General-purpose cooking (for instance, sautéing, shallow frying, etc.)
•    Cooking foods that need a lid, for instance, simmering, wilting, braising, etc.)
•    High heat searing

Final Thought

A sauté pan is necessary cookware you ought to have in your kitchen. It’s useful in handling various foods using different cooking techniques.

Sources
chefscornerstore.com
therationalkitchen.com
misen.com